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A man who was wrongfully convicted in a 1983 Tampa murder is suing the city and police

In this Aug. 27 2020 file photo, former inmate Robert DuBoise, 56, meets reporters with his sister Harriet, left, and mother Myra, right, outside the Hardee County Correctional Institute after serving 37 years in prison, when officials discovered new evidence that proved his innocence in Hardee County, Fla.  DuBoise, exonerated of a 1983 rape and murder after serving 37 years in prison is suing over his wrongful conviction in which a a questionable bite mark was critical evidence.
Steve Nesius
/
AP
In this Aug. 27 2020 file photo, former inmate Robert DuBoise, 56, meets reporters with his sister Harriet, left, and mother Myra, right, outside the Hardee County Correctional Institute after serving 37 years in prison, when officials discovered new evidence that proved his innocence in Hardee County, Fla. DuBoise, exonerated of a 1983 rape and murder after serving 37 years in prison is suing over his wrongful conviction in which a a questionable bite mark was critical evidence.

A man who was cleared after serving 37 years in prison for the rape and murder of a woman in Tampa has filed suit against the city and police.

Robert DuBoise was charged in the 1983 death of 19-year-old Barbara Grams.

A forensic dentist testified that a bite mark on Grams’ cheek was from DuBoise, based on a beeswax mold made of his teeth.

He was freed in August 2020 after untested DNA evidence from a rape kit proved he was innocent.

DuBoise has filed a federal lawsuit last week against the forensic dentist, along with the city of Tampa and four police investigators.

He is seeing unspecified damages.

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