UWF Archaeology Institute

Downtown Improvement Board

First, it was Spanish foodways, highlighting the discovery of the 1559 Luna Settlement.

This year’s Pensacola Repast dinner, held last month by the Downtown Improvement Board, explored the multicultural influences of what was cooking here two centuries ago, during the Early American period in the 1800’s.

University of West Florida

One of the ways Pensacola’s cultural heritage is celebrated is through the individual people who lived here generations ago.

A recent event highlighted the city’s culinary history through the lives of four unique and diverse women who made Pensacola their home in the early 1800’s.

We’re getting to know Victoire Le Sassier, Marianna Bonifay, Dorothy Walton, and Genevieve Ham. Their stories were featured during the 2018 Pensacola Repast event held May 6, downtown. 

John Worth / UWF Archaeology Institute

University of West Florida archaeology students and researchers have spent the summer uncovering more details about the 1559 Luna Settlement.

The Tristan de Luna Settlement overlooking Pensacola Bay existed for just two years until 1561.

Four hundred and fifty eight years after being sunk by a hurricane in Pensacola Bay, archeologists are working to make sure some undiscovered ships in Tristan de Luna’s fleet won’t face a new, twenty first century threat.

Three of de Luna’s vessels, of the six scuttled by the hurricane in 1559, have been discovered and are under investigation, including one discovered in 2016. There is speculation that the other three could be in the general area of the new Bay Bridge construction site.

UWF

Despite the loss of $3 million in budget vetoes, the University of West Florida appears to be on solid footing heading into next fiscal year.

The 2017 legislative process was the first for UWF with Dr. Martha Saunders at the helm. After the dust settled from last week’s Special Session, WUWF invited President Saunders to discuss how the university fared.

Michael Spooneybarger/ CREO

Two shipwrecks in Pensacola Bay off Emanuel Point, from Tristan de Luna’s 1559 fleet, now have state recognition through an historical marker dedicated Friday morning.

The Emanuel Point Shipwrecks Marker includes descriptive text in both English and Spanish.

Considered a major archeological find, the two ships that sank during a hurricane, about five weeks after landing on what’s now Santa Rosa Island, have yielded a treasure trove of information about 16th century colonial expeditions, life aboard ships and naval architecture.

For the past year, the University of West Florida Archaeology Institute has taken the lead on a grant project entitled By These Hands: The Vernacular Markers of Pensacola’s Historic African American Cemeteries.

The information collected is being used to weave together previously untold stories of the burial grounds and the people in them.