Hurricane Ivan

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

In our recent report on the 40th anniversary of Hurricane Frederic, much of the focus was the storm’s impact on the large dunes that existed on Pensacola Beach at the time.

Today, we’re taking a closer look at the formation and importance of coastal dunes, ongoing threats, and efforts to grow and stabilize them. 

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

For the Pensacola area, Hurricane Ivan, which slammed the Florida-Alabama Gulf Coast 15 years ago, is now THE storm by which all others are compared.

Prior to that, it was Hurricane Opal in 1995 and Hurricane Frederic, which barreled ashore 40 years ago, in September 1979.

Frederic caused a lot of damage along the gulf coast and vividly changed the landscape of the region’s beaches, including Pensacola Beach.

Sam Upshaw Jr. / Pensacola News Journal

In the years since Hurricane Ivan, everyone who lived through the storm learned some lessons from the experience. Katie King, a photographer the Pensacola News Journal at the time of the storm and Troy Moon who was a reporter at the paper talked about those lessons.

Bruce Graner / Pensacola News Journal

Every neighborhood in the region was affected by Hurricane Ivan, and telling the stories of those neighborhoods meant finding a way for reporters to travel to those neighborhoods.

Troy Moon was a reporter for the news journal when Ivan hit.

Katie King / Pensacola News Journal

It’s been 15 years since Hurricane Ivan changed the landscape of northwest Florida. Back in 2004, Tom Ninestine was the Metro Editor of the Pensacola News Journal. Today, Tom is the Managing Editor here at WUWF. He recently sat down with a couple of colleagues who were working with him at the PNJ when the storm hit. This is part one of their conversation.

Escambia County Emergency Management

The 2018 Atlantic Hurricane is now over.

The six-month period ended Friday, Nov. 30. In northwest Florida, the season is being remembered most for Hurricane Michael, a powerful, late-developing storm that devastated some neighboring communities.

“We were very fortunate,” said Santa Rosa County Public Safety Director Brad Baker.

Sandra Averhart / WUWF Public Media

In the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, dozens of individuals have been lining up locally to become American Red Cross volunteers. For some, it’s a first time experience, while others are refreshing their training.

Still others are already in the trenches, and loving every minute of it.

Meet the Hinds.

“My name is Kaffey,” said Kaffey Hinds, introducing herself.  “It’s K-a-f-f-e-y. And, this is my husband Lee.”

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the American Red Cross of Northwest Florida has ramped up their recruitment and training of volunteers.

“Thank you all for coming,” said volunteer Sheila Mitchell, as she welcomed a group of prospective volunteers to the latest training session at the Pensacola office. “This is great to have this much of a turnout.”

Mitchell says losing her house in Hurricane Ivan is what drove her to become a Red Cross volunteer, which she’s done for the past three years.

"Our funding is running out. At the end of March, if we haven't used the money, we have to give it back". That's Andrea Wick, the Executive Administrator of REBUILD Northwest Florida. She’s talking about the grant money from FEMA that funds REBUILD NWFL. "If we've used (the money) and we show that there's a large enough response, there's a chance we can get more to continue."

Gulf Power Company

As the month of October was beginning in 2004, the region was still reeling from the September 16 landfall of Hurricane Ivan. One of the most significant impacts of the extensive storm damage was the loss of electricity. In Northwest Florida, that means Gulf Power Company was at the center of restoration efforts.

Ultimately, the utility’s response to the storm went a long way toward helping the company improve its storm readiness today.

WUWF News

In 2004, the country was in the middle of the so-called housing bubble. Prices were rising all across the country. Here in northwest Florida, it was a bit more subdued.

Lynn Peters, the President of the Pensacola Association of Realtors says that the inventory of available houses in the Pensacola region was selling nicely in the months before Hurricane Ivan. As 2004 began there were over 21 hundred properties for sale in the market. By August, that was down to under 17 hundred.

fhwa.gov

In the next installment of our look back at Hurricane Ivan ten years ago, WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody reports on the Interstate-10 Bridge -- a major traffic artery that was severed and then built back even better.

The original four-lane bridge opened in 1968, consisting of twin spans of two lanes each with no shoulders. Connecting Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, it’s a vital link on an I-10 that reaches across the southern part of the United States from Jacksonville to Los Angeles.

University of West Florida

In this week’s Economic Report, Dr. Rick Harper reviews where the region is ‘10 years on from Hurricane Ivan.’ The devastating storm struck the Florida-Alabama gulf coast, coming ashore at Gulf Shores, Alabama on September 16, 2004.

Emerald Coast Utilities Authority

As part of WUWF’s look back at Hurricane Ivan on its 10th anniversary, it turns out the storm did lead the way towards replacing Pensacola’s water treatment plant, which had been in service since 1937.

Ivan’s 100-plus mile and hour winds and storm surges of up to 15 feet mortally wounded the Main Street Treatment plant. A power outage knocked it off line for three and a half days -- resulting in a toxic brew of storm water, storm surge and raw sewage flooding parts of downtown Pensacola.

Okaloosa County Remembers Ivan

Sep 18, 2014
Patsy Knox

  Ten years ago, Hurricane Ivan brought widespread destruction to the region.  In Northwest Florida, Escambia and Santa Rosa counties were closest to the eye and suffered the most damage. As part of WUWF’s 10th anniversary series, Danielle Freeman has this look at the storm’s impact on Okaloosa County.  

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