Bernardo de Galvez

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

General Bernardo de Gálvez returned to Pensacola Tuesday morning as the Pensacola Heritage Foundation unveiled a statue of the Revolutionary War hero. Pensacola Mayor Ashton Hayward and a crowd of a couple of hundred people watched and cheered as the statue on the corner of Palafox and Wright Streets was unveiled.

Guillermo Fesser is a journalist from Spain who has been living in the U.S. for about a decade. He had been looking for stories to tell about Spanish speaking heroes for young Latinos living in the states. "Suddenly I found, 2 years ago, that someone was trying to hang a painting (of a Hispanic general on Capitol Hill, who helped George )Washington win the Revolutionary War against the British.

Bob Barrett / WUWF News

Another historical figure from Pensacola’s past is getting a monument downtown. "What makes great cities is art and culture" said Pensacola Mayor Ashton Hayward speaking to a crowd of donors and dignitaries Monday morning. They were gathered for a groundbreaking ceremony for a monument to Revolutionary War hero Bernardo de Galvez, the general who drove the British out of Pensacola during the Battle of Pensacola.

Dave Dunwoody, WUWF Public Media

Dignitaries from both Pensacola and Pensacola’s Spanish sister city gathered at Fort George Saturday, to wrap up a week of tributes to Spanish General Bernardo de. Galvez.

The 35-minute ceremony was much more subdued than in recent years, when reenactors in period uniforms paraded up Palafox Street to the fort, firing their muskets along the way.

John LeRoy, Vice President of the Pensacola Archaeological Society, hosted the event and gave a bit of history about Galvez getting some little-known help during the Battle of Pensacola in 1781.

wikipedia.org

Officials from Pensacola’s sister city are coming in Tuesday for the annual celebration of the life of General Bernardo de Galvez.

Antonio Campos, the Mayor of Macharaviaya, Spain, is leading the delegation to Pensacola to honor Galvez, whose army defeated the British at Fort George in the 1781 Battle of Pensacola – which was recognized by General George Washington as a deciding factor in the American Revolution.

IHMC

Pensacola prides itself on its long history, but it has been hard to translate that into real interest from visitors. Our local history has always taken a backseat, in terms of an active tourism draw, to places like the beach, Fort Pickens or to the Naval aviation museum, which is of course history, but not so much local history.

A familiar visitor from Pensacola’s original mother country sailed into the Port of Pensacola Wednesday morning. The Spanish tall ship Juan Sebastian de Elcano is part of Pensacola’s 66th annual Fiesta of Five Flags.

The reception at the T.T. Wentworth Florida State Museum welcomed the crew of the ship, a training vessel that’s the third tallest tall ship in the world.  

UWF Communications

Bernardo de Galvez , the Spanish general who defeated the British at the Battle of Pensacola in 1781, becomes a permanent part of the T.T. Wentworth Florida State Museum on Thursday.

Congressman Jeff Miller will present a Nina Fritz portrait of Galvez to the museum, which itself sits near the battle site in downtown Pensacola. Last summer, he took to the House floor to urge passage of House Joint Resolution 105, granting Galvez honorary American citizenship.

A resolution was passed 231 years ago to hang a portrait of Bernardo de Galvez on the walls of Congress. It’s now on display.

Galvez's portrait hangs on the wall of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee room inside the Capitol. Sen. Robert Menendez (D-NJ) oversaw the task. The painting joins a statue outside the State Department in honoring the Spaniard’s service to the fledgling United States.

State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory

May 8th was designated “Bernardo de Galvez Day” in Pensacola, where the Spanish general led a 61-day siege in 1781 to oust the British from northwest Florida, in what many call a key battle of the American Revolution.