League of Women Voters-Pensacola

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Voting is now underway in the August 28 Primary Election. But, for individuals who still need more information about the candidates before casting their ballot, the League of Women Voters is doing its part to help.

The main mission of the League is to encourage informed, active participation in government. The non-partisan organization does that through voter registration, voter advocacy, and voter education.

Florida Legislature Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability

A coalition of groups, including the Pensacola Bay Area League of Women Voters, is presenting the eighth program in their series of “Pipeline to Prison” community forums Monday evening at Franco’s Italian Restaurant on Gregory Street.

ACLU

Efforts are underway in Escambia County to address what’s known as the "school-to-prison pipeline." The issue was the subject of a panel discussion on Monday, Aug. 31 at Franco’s Restaurant, 523 E. Gregory St., Pensacola.

On at least five occasions dating back to 1967, voters in Escambia County have rejected the idea of switching from an elected school superintendent to an appointed one. But, there’s now a renewed discussion about the topic in the run up to the 2016 General Election.

“I am just a concerned citizen with a tremendous passion for education,” said Pensacola businessman Robert de Varona, who’s behind the latest push to make the change to an appointed superintendent in the Escambia County School District.

Efforts are underway in the state to get a constitutional amendment on the 2016 General Election ballot that would restore voting rights to felons on the state’s 2016 General Election ballot. On Monday, March 2, the Pensacola Coffee Party and League of Women Voters of the Pensacola Bay Area will present a public discussion of the topic. The forum will be held at Franco’s Italian Restaurant at 6 p.m.

Currently, Florida is one of the toughest states in the country - along with Kentucky and Iowa- for ex-felons seeking to have their civil rights restored.

Photo via Flickr//Vox Efx

  While the governor's race has been the main topic of conversation heading up to Election Day, there are some proposed amendments to the state constitution on the ballot, too. 

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No Party Affiliation voters in Florida are helping fuel a national trend by rejecting both the Democratic and Republican parties in now-record numbers. WUWF’s Dave Dunwoody reports.

The reasons are many – political bickering; no desire to identify as either a Republican or Democrat, and not wanting to be pigeonholed on certain issues. According to state figures, Florida’s voter rolls have added more than 500,000 names in the past four years – 90% of which are unaffiliated. In the meantime, the two major parties have remained for the most part stagnant.